Good work starts with the right type of permit.

Typically a permit is required to construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move or change the occupancy of a building or structure, or to erect, install, enlarge, alter, repair, convert, or replace any electrical, gas, mechanical or plumbing system. For specific permit and inspection requirements, select from the list below:

PLUMBING PERMITS
A plumbing permit IS REQUIRED to do the following:

A plumbing permit IS NOT REQUIRED in the following circumstances:

If you are not sure if you need a permit, call your local building department.

Where do I get a permit for plumbing work?
Permits are issued at your local building department, depending on the jurisdiction responsible for your area. In most cases, you'll complete a form, pay a fee, and get your permit. If a plumbing contractor is doing the work, it is the contractor's responsibility to get the permit and ensure that required inspections are done. The plumbing permit will be issued in the name of the party performing the work.
 
How do I get an inspection?
If you are having the work done by a plumbing contractor, the contractor is required to notify the inspecting jurisdiction when the work is ready to be inspected. If you are doing the work yourself, call your local building department to request an inspection. If you have installed water piping, the work must be operational for inspection. Inspectors may require that drainage piping be plugged and filled with water for inspection.


MECHANICAL PERMITS:

What is mechanical work?
Mechanical work on one- or two-family dwellings includes heating, cooling, or ventilation systems, including bath vents and wood stoves. Installation, alteration, or repair of gas piping between the meter and an appliance or other equipment, including all liquefied petroleum gas piping, is also considered mechanical work.

A permit IS REQUIRED to do the following: 

If you are not sure whether or not you need a permit, call your local building department.

How do I get a permit for mechanical work?
Permits are issued by your local building department.

What information do I need?
Plans are generally not necessary to obtain a permit to do mechanical work on a dwelling. You will be expected to briefly describe the work proposed. For example, describe the appliance you intend to install and whether you will be installing a new vent, new ductwork, etc. If you are installing new gas piping, know how many outlets for future gas appliances you need. 

If applying for a permit to install or replace a wood stove or fireplace insert, you will be asked whether the appliance is certified to meet Department of Environmental Quality emission standards. The inspector will check the label on the stove or stove insert at inspection. If you are not sure whether the appliance is certified to meet emission standards, ask the dealer or a mechanical inspector.

A mechanical inspector or building department office staff member can discuss your project with you. If all the necessary information is available, you can usually leave with your permit.

Mechanical permit fees are generally based on the number of appliances, chimneys, vents, or gas piping outlets that will be installed. Permit fees are paid when the permit is issued.

How do I get an inspection?
Any work done under a permit must be inspected by a certified mechanical inspector. Call your local building department. A minimum of 24 hours' notice is generally required for inspections. When you call, you will be asked for the permit number, homeowner's name, project address, type of inspection needed, and the date on which inspection is desired. Be prepared to furnish detailed directions to the job site. Unless all of the work is outside and accessible, an adult needs to be at the site to provide access for the inspector.


ELECTRICAL PERMITS:

A permit IS REQUIRED to do the following: 

For homeowners, a permit is not required to replace electrical devices or to perform the maintenance on an existing electrical installation. If you are unsure about whether or not you need a permit, call your local building department.

How do I get a permit for electrical work?
Permits are issued by your local building department. Drawn plans are not necessary to get a permit to do residential electrical work. You need to know the structure's square footage, the panel's amperage, and the number of circuits. Fees are based on these figures.

An electrical inspector or building department office staff member.can discuss your project with you. If you have the necessary information for the proposed project, you can usually leave with your permit. Electrical permit fees are paid when the permit is issued.
 
How do I get an inspection?
Any work performed under a permit must be inspected by a certified electrical inspector. You may call the inspection request line at your local building department within 24 hours of completion of any phase of the project. A minimum of 24-hours' notice is usually required for inspections.

When you call, you will be asked for the permit number, homeowner's name, project address, type of inspection needed, and date on which the inspection is desired. Be prepared to furnish detailed directions to the job site and a detailed description of the electrical work performed. Unless all of the work is outside and accessible, an adult needs to be at the site to provide access for the inspector.

When do I need an inspection?
Most electrical permits require three inspections: rough-in, service and final.

Call for a rough-in inspection when all of the new circuits are wired, grounding wires are in, the raceways and boxes are installed, and any necessary nail plates are put on. Do not cover any work with insulation, receptacles, or wall switches until the inspector has approved it.

Call for a service inspection when the service electrical mast, the electric meter base, the service panels, and the grounding electrodes and terminals have been installed. Wires must be visible without removing cover devices. Sometimes, the inspector is able to inspect these items during the rough-in inspection.

Call for a final inspection upon completion of the electrical work. Be sure that panel boxes are covered and circuits are labeled in the correct spaces on the box. All of the equipment, fixtures, switches, and appliances must be installed, grounded, and energized for the final inspection.

Planning to do electrical work on your one- or two-family dwelling?
You must be both the owner and the occupant of the dwelling to obtain a permit to do the electrical work yourself. You may not perform any electrical installations or modifications on a house or residential unit intended for sale, lease, rent, or exchange. If you do not own and do not intend to live in the unit, a licensed electrical contractor must do the work.

A landlord, landlord's agent, or the employee of the landlord or landlord's agent may replace an existing garbage disposal, dishwasher, or electric water heater with a similar appliance of 30 amps or less, single phase, in residential properties.

If you have any questions concerning your eligibility to work on a building, contact your local building department.


BUILDING PERMITS (Structural):

A permit IS REQUIRED to:

If you are not sure whether or not you need a permit, contact your local building department.

What information will I need to get a permit?

Who must review my project?
An Oregon-certified plans examiner will review your plans to ensure the proposed project meets the requirements of the One-and Two-Family Dwelling Specialty Code. If additional information or changes are necessary, you will be contacted by phone or mail and asked to furnish the information.

Who gets the permit?
As the owner of a one- or two-family dwelling, you can hire a contractor registered by the Construction Contractors Board or you can get the permit and do the work yourself. An immediate family member, a friend, neighbor, tenant, or other relative can legally work on your one- or two-family dwelling only if the work is not for compensation.
How long does it take to get a permit?

A plan review generally takes up to two weeks for one- and two-family dwellings. Time frames can change, depending on the complexity of the project and the completeness of the information you submit with your application.

When you submit your plans, you will be asked to pay the plan review fee. You may also pay the structural permit fee at that time or when the permit is issued. When your plans have been reviewed, stamped "approved" and signed, one set will be returned to you with your permit.
 
When can work begin?

When your permit has been issued and one set of your approved plans returned, work can begin. The permit and plans must be on the job site and available to the inspector. To change your plans from what was originally approved, you must show the changes on two additional sets of plans and take them to the Building Codes Division field office or your local building department. Do not mark the approved set.

How do I get an inspection?
Any work done under a permit must be inspected by a certified inspector. You may call the inspection request line at your local building department within 24 hours of completion of any phase of the project. A minimum of 24 hours' notice is usually required for inspections.

When you call, you will be asked for the permit number, homeowner's name, project address, type of inspection needed, and date on which inspection is desired. Be prepared to furnish detailed directions to the job site. Unless all of the work is outside and accessible, an adult needs to be at the site to provide access for the inspector.

503.873.1157  :  info@thinkpermit.com  :  www.thinkpermit.com

This website is maintained by the Oregon Building Officials Association.